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English

ENGC102  College Composition I - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
In this course, students learn to write clearly and effectively for defined audiences through a variety of strategies. Emphasis is on the writing process from prewriting through drafting, revising, and editing. Students become aware of the variety of strategies, behaviors, habits, and attitudes and choose those that help them improve. Writing nonfiction from personal experience and observation as well as from library and electronic sources, students gain confidence and learn basic writing principles.(Prerequisite: Accuplacer Sentence Skills score of 78.)

ENGC110  Writing Workshop - 2 Class Hours/2 Credits
Writing Workshop provides a challenging but supportive environment in which student, faculty, and staff writers determine and pursue individual writing goals. Past writing has ranged from book reviews, research writing, editorials, proposals, and technical pieces to poems, stories, memoirs, and personal essays. Participants present their work for discussion, and they read and respond to drafts presented by others in the group. Workshop discussion focuses on process, interpretation, craft and problem-solving. (Prerequisite: ENGC102 and ENGC201 or permission of instructor.)

ENGC122  Professional Writing - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
Applying principles used in business and industry, this course prepares students to use a variety of writing styles for communication within the professional community. Students will create and analyze workplace documents, including memos, instructions, feasibility reports, and proposals, will build on an understanding of issues of audience and purpose, and will learn to utilize visual devices, including a focus on document design and layout, to make documents more effective. Attention will also be placed on critical review and revision both as initiated by the individual student and as completed in response to the feedback of peers. (Prerequisite: ENGC102) (Does not fulfill the second English requirement.)

ENGC200  Grammar For Writing - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
Grammar is studied in relationship to the content and structure of writing. Examples will be elicited from student and professional writers so that actual grammar patterns in their breadth and variation can be analyzed, evaluated, and practiced. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC201  College Composition II - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
College Composition II builds directly on the skills and attitudes developed in College Composition I. Students will reach beyond personal knowledge toward expertise through research. Writing a variety of academic papers with strong emphasis on a research essay, students become active investigators, synthesizing traditional sources and personal expertise in order to combine insight and evidence. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC202  Meetinghouse Readings - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
In Meetinghouse Readings students become active investigators attending live presentations by prominent writers, reading works by those writers, and meeting to explore both the relationship between how writers present themselves in person and in their works and the differences between experiencing work in person and on the page. The Meetinghouse Readings rank among the nation’s most successful grassroots literary programs. The readings celebrate literacy and literature, particularly the literature of northern New England, and are inspired by the examples of old-time Chautauqua meeting and the great reading tours of Dickens and Twain. Over the years, reading schedules have featured National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize winners as well as writers whose reputations are just emerging. Past readers include nationally prominent poets and writers whose works are often set in and about the small towns in northern New England, writers such as Grace Paley, Andre Dubus, Donald Hall, Michael Dorris, Louise Erdrich, Sydney Lea, Mark Doty, Charles Simic, Alice Munro, Ernest Hebert, Rosellen Brown and many other writers from the region and beyond. The readings and discussions will be held in Canaan’s historic and beautiful 1793 Meetinghouse. (Prerequisite: ENGC102 or permission of instructor.)

ENGC206  Creative Writing - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
This course puts emphasis on discussion of student works of both fiction and poetry by peers. It depends on growth through exposure to other types of writing as well as through in-depth discussion of the strengths, weaknesses and potential of each piece. (Prerequisite: ENGC101.)

ENGC231  Reading Modern Poetry - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
With an emphasis on poetry written in the twentieth century, students will become familiar with a wide range of poems. Through careful reading, discussion, and short written essays, students will consider why poems are important and how they address our lives on levels both personal and social. Students will look at poems from two perspectives, those of reader and writer, encountering questions such as how a poem is made, what tools a writer uses to shape it, as well as what the reader can bring to the poem. Working as individuals and in small groups, students will discover how to enjoy and to talk about poems as works of art that enrich all our lives. (Prerequisite: ENGC102 or permission of instructor.)

ENGC232  Reading Short Fiction - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
In this course, students will read, analyze, interpret, discuss, and write about short fiction. Readings will include various forms of the story, as well as stories from different culture, countries and centuries. Emphasis will be on the close, careful reading of text, and students will be introduced to the concepts and terminology of prose literature, including plot, conflict, characterization, theme, point of view, and imagery. This course meets the requirement for the second 3 credits of English.(Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC235  Poetry Workshop - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
Building on writing principles and critiquing abilities learned in College Composition I, students will begin to investigate the differences between prose and poetry. Through exercises and revision, and especially by reading and discussing some contemporary poems, students will learn to recognize and employ some of the basic tools of free verse. Working together on their own and one another’s poems with the emphasis on sharing work and offering constructive criticism, students will learn what does, and what does not work in their own poems. This course meets the requirements for the second course in English. (Co/Prerequisite: ENGC231 or permission of instructor.)

ENGC236  Fiction Writing Workshop - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
Building on writing principles and critiquing abilities learned in College Composition I, students will begin to explore the art of creating a successful short story. Through reading a variety of established voices in contemporary fiction, completing writing exercises both in and out of class, and participation in workshop discussion, students will develop a sense of the basic tools of fiction. With an emphasis on sharing work and giving constructive criticism, this class will enable students to make choices about drafting and revising their stories and to develop their own individual style. A final portfolio of revised and polished stories representative of the semester’s work will be completed. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC237  Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
This upper level course is meant to allow students who have experience with a poetry writing workshop environment to further their art. Students will be required to critique poems using vocabulary and critical reading skills developed in ENGC235, and to participate in intensive in class writing exercise as a way to garner ideas. The course will focus on further development of individual style and voice and on a closer examination of poetic devices and their use. Students will be expected to view growth in the broader sense, through poem to poem development, revision choices and the influence of outside work by established poets. A final portfolio of revised and polished poems representative of the semesters work will be completed. (Prerequisite: ENGC235.)

ENGC240  American Literature to 1877 - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
This course samples American literature from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century. Each of the readings will be examined within the context of the character and history of US literature. The course covers the evolution of literature as a contributing factor to the development of a nation. Works of major American writers such as William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, Cotton Mather, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Paine, Thomas Jefferson, Phillis Wheatley, James Fenimore Cooper, Edgar Allan Poe, Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, or Louisa May Alcott may be selected for study. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC241  American Literature: 1877 to Present - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
This course samples American literature from the late nineteenth century to contemporary time. Each of the readings will be examined within the context of the character and history of US literature. The course covers the evolution of literature as a contributing factor to the development of a nation. Works of major American writers such as Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Sarah Orne Jewett, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, Robert Frost, Willa Cather, Eugene O’Neill, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsburg, Sylvia Plath, Amy Tan, Toni Morrison, and others may be selected for study. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC249  Sarah Josepha Hale Award Writers - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
Since Robert Frost accepted the first Sarah Josepha Hale Award medal, distinguished writers associated with New England (including18 who have been awarded 24 Pulitzer Prizes, 3 National Book Awards, and 2 Newbery Medals) travel to Newport NH to accept the Richard’s Library annual literary award. Sarah Josepha Hale Award Writers builds directly on the skills and attitudes developed in College Composition I. Students will reach beyond personal knowledge toward expertise through research on challenging writers and reflection about connections between the works and responses to the works. Writing a variety of academic papers with strong emphasis on a final research essay, hearing library tapes of various award lectures, and attending live readings by award writers, students become active investigators, seeking evidence to synthesize personal expertise and the insights of the Sarah Josepha Hale Award Writers. (Prerequisite: ENGC102.)

ENGC280  Nobel Literature Laureates - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
The Nobel Prize in Literature is awarded to “the person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work of an idealistic tendency.” Since the first Nobel prize in literature was awarded in 1901, Nobel Laureates have been recognized as the finest international writers who celebrate the human spirit. Through comparative literary study of Nobel Laureates, students will portray a global view of the best in contemporary world literature. (Prerequisite: ENGC102 and a literature elective.)

ENGC286  Children’s Literature - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits
This course presents children’s literature from infancy to adolescence. The course utilizes a transactional view of reading and a variety of writing assignments. Students will examine a wide range of genres in order to develop their abilities to appreciate, critique, and select high quality children’s literature. Students will also become familiar with resources available on children’s literature and will discuss current issues and trends in the field. (Prerequisite: ENGC102)

ENGC290 Creative Writing Capstone - 3 Class Hours/3 Credits

The Creative Writing Capstone is completed in a student’s final semester in the creative writing program. In this advanced seminar, the student continues to hone his or her writing through a self-designed project aimed toward developing a final portfolio of polished work. Under the tutelage of faculty, students will work toward further revision, synthesize their experiences as developing writers while providing evidence of movement toward individual stylistic choices, and discuss their professional influences and mentors. This will culminate in a final written report describing the project and the work done toward its completion.(Prerequisites: All ENGC required courses)